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Listening Session: Emerging Issues Around COVID-19 and People of Color with Disabilities for Minority-Serving Institution Scientific Workforce Capacity Building

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Listening Session: Emerging Issues Around COVID-19 and People of Color with Disabilities for Minority-Serving Institution Scientific Workforce Capacity Building

The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Research and Capacity Building for Minority Entities at Langston University (LU-RRTC) is facilitating a FREE, national online discussion for the minority-serving institution scientific workforce focused on emerging issues around people of color with disabilities (i.e., African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and Asian Americans or Pacific Islanders) and COVID-19 current, short-term, and long-term disability/health and rehabilitation research and research capacity building implications.

Listening Session: Emerging Issues Around COVID-19 and People of Color with Disabilities for Minority-Serving Institution Scientific Workforce Capacity Building

Date and Time: Wednesday, May 27, 2020: 2-3:30 pm EST

About the Listening Session: The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Research and Capacity Building for Minority Entities at Langston University (LU-RRTC) is facilitating a FREE, national online discussion for the minority-serving institution scientific workforce focused on emerging issues around people of color with disabilities (i.e., African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and Asian Americans or Pacific Islanders) and COVID-19 current, short-term, and long-term disability/health and rehabilitation research and research capacity building implications. Faculty members and researchers at minority-serving institutions will engage around key emerging research capacity-building needs and strategies, share ways to address issues, and identify key research topics and priorities useful to the field. We will host a listening session (90 minutes) to frame the context for a national long-term research capacity building agenda for applied minority disability/health and rehabilitation research. The Listening Session will not be recorded but will capture key themes from the conversation proceedings that will be shared in a policy brief tool uploaded on the LU-RRTC website.

 

The Listening Session will feature:

  • Live, 90-minute Listening Session via ZOOM video conferencing to understand the current reality on the ground as a tool to develop short-term and long-term research capacity building strategies and models that empower historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs), Hispanic serving institutions (HSIs), Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs), and Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-serving institutions (AANAPISIs) to engage in COVID-19 applied research.
  • At least 60 minutes of structured conversation and information exchange and sharing of key resources and lessons learned.
  • Key proceedings theme results collected at baseline during the Listening Session proceedings will help assess the short-term and long-term longitudinal implications of COVID-19 on the disability/health and rehabilitation needs of persons of color with disabilities, and new and refined models that seek to build the research capacity and support this work across the minority-serving institution scientific workforce.
  • Research capacity building tools and other relevant resources.

Presenters:

Camara Phyllis Jones, MD, MPH, PhD — Evelyn Green Davis Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University and Adjunct Associate Professor at Morehouse School of Medicine

 

Corey L. Moore, RhD— Principal Investigator and Research Director at the LU-RRTC

 

 

 

 

 

Facilitator:

Edward Manyibe, PhD—Research Associate Professor and Capacity Building Director at the LU-RRTC.

Who Should Attend: All faculty members and researchers in the disability/health and rehabilitation field at HBCUs, HSIs, TCUs, and AANAPISIs; and other stakeholders interested in research involving people of color with disabilities.

Because of recent security issue around Zoom, we will require a registration process for this session. Register in advance for this meeting: LU-RRTC National Listening Session

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

If you have any questions regarding registration for this webinar, please contact Andre Washington at: andre.washington@langston.edu.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT: Funding for this Listening Session was provided by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR grant number 90RTST0001). NIDILRR is a Center within the Administration for Community Living (ACL), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

 

Speakers’ Bio sketches

Camara Phyllis Jones, MD, MPH, PhD is the 2019-2020 Evelyn Green Davis Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, and a Past President of the American Public Health Association (2015-2016). She is a family physician and epidemiologist whose work focuses on naming, measuring, and addressing the impacts of racism on the health and well-being of the nation and the world. Dr. Jones was an Assistant Professor at the Harvard School of Public Health (1994 to 2000) before being recruited to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2000 to 2014), where she served as a Medical Officer and Research Director on Social Determinants of Health and Equity. Most recently, she was a Senior Fellow at the Satcher Health Leadership Institute and the Cardiovascular Research Institute at the Morehouse School of Medicine (2013 to 2019). She is actively sought as a contributor to national efforts to eliminate health disparities and achieve health equity, including as a faculty member for the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education’s Pursuing Excellence in the Clinical Learning Environment collaborative addressing Health Care Disparities; as a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Roundtable on Black Men and Black Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine; and as a Project Advisor and on-screen expert for the groundbreaking film series Unnatural Causes: Is Inequality Making Us Sick? Highly valued as a mentor and teacher, she is also an Adjunct Professor at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University and an Adjunct Associate Professor at the Morehouse School of Medicine. Her many honors include the Wellesley Alumnae Achievement Award (Wellesley College’s highest alumnae honor, 2018), the John Snow Award (given in recognition of “enduring contributions to public health through epidemiologic methods and practice” by the American Public Health Association’s Epidemiology Section, 2011), and awards named after luminaries David Satcher (2003), Hildrus A. Poindexter (2009), Paul Cornely (2016), Shirley Nathan Pulliam (2016), Louis Stokes (2018), Frances Borden-Hubbard (2018), and Cato T. Laurencin (2018). Dr. Jones earned her BA in Molecular Biology from Wellesley College, her MD from the Stanford University School of Medicine, and both her Master of Public Health and her PhD in Epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. She also completed residency training in General Preventive Medicine at Johns Hopkins and in Family Practice at the Residency Program in Social Medicine at Montefiore Medical Center.

Corey L. Moore, Rh.D., CRC is the Principal Investigator and Research Director at the National Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Research and Capacity Building for Minority Entities at Langston University (LU-RRTC). He provides oversight for all Center research, training, knowledge translation, and research capacity building agendas, and serves as chief methodologist for all on-going RRTC research programs. He has served as Principal Investigator for sixteen (16) different United States (U.S.) Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Education research, training and service grants/cooperative agreements exceeding 20 million dollars. Dr. Moore was an Institute for Rehabilitation Issues (IRI) National Scholar for the 38th IRI entitled: “Serving Traditionally Underserved Populations”. He has also held the prestigious Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc. Distinguished Professor Endowed Chair (DPEC) and has authored or co-authored more than 60 refereed articles, monographs, and technical briefs. Prior to coming to Langston University, he was employed as a Research Assistant Professor (Research Scientist/Co-Principal Investigator) at the NIDILRR-funded RRTC for Persons who are Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing (RT-31)-University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. He has received several national research and service awards such as the National Rehabilitation Association’s (NRA) Sylvia Walker National Multicultural Award, National Association of Multicultural Rehabilitation Concerns (NAMRC) Bobbie Atkins’ Research Award, and Thurgood Marshall College Fund, Inc. Outstanding Leadership in Faculty Research Award. He earned his Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from the University of Georgia, Master of Science in Rehabilitation Counseling from the University of Kentucky, and Doctorate in Rehabilitation Counselor Research and Education from Southern Illinois University-Carbondale. Dr. Moore is a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc. (Zeta Iota Chapter-University of Georgia, Spring 1992).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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